Condition: Yellow - responsible preparation, and fun, for an unpredictable world

Three Targets with Reload From Concealment

Three Targets with Reload From Concealment

Here’s a drill run from concealment using standard EDC kit.

The drill I concentrated on is a 6-shot drill, using 3 targets at 10 yards, spaced 3 yards apart. My target area is typically a paper plate (as shown below). The drill goes as follows:

  • At the beep (time), draw from concealment while moving “off the X”
  • Engage each target with one shot (slide locks back, empty)
  • Draw replacement magazine from concealment while moving “off the X,” all while keeping eyes on last target
  • Reload, rack the slide to charge the pistol
  • Re-engage the targets in reverse order
  • Check the environment (around and behind you)

Time for the drill should be less than 6 seconds.

My best time today (with accurate hits) was 4.81 seconds.

3 targets at 10 yards, 3-yards apart

Above: Three targets 10 yards away, spaced 3 yards apart. The target area for each is one of the paper plates.

EDC During Wartime

by Andy Rutledge 0 Comments
EDC During Wartime

My everyday carry complement has changed over the year. As we are currently at war (and will likely be at war for centuries) I carry what will allow me to better respond to a wartime attack by a trained group. This means extra rounds, a larger firearm, and a tourniquet. More on this in my article here.

Here (below) is my EDC kit.

Wartime EDC

Shooting Drill: The Federal Air Marshal Pistol Qualification

by Andy Rutledge 0 Comments
Shooting Drill: The Federal Air Marshal Pistol Qualification

If you’re anything like me, you’re always looking for ways to use the range facilities at your disposal in the most productive ways possible. At my indoor range, for instance, I cannot draw from a holster and the narrow shooting lanes prohibit all but the smallest body dynamics. So there I work on mag-exchange drills, hand drills, and plain ol target practice.

When I get to my local outdoor practical range there is very little I cannot do, but I have a hard time settling on specific drills to work. Despite the fact that I’m a competitive shooter, I only ever use my concealed carry holster and pistols when working on pistol drills there (Since my daily carry setup is concealed, that’s how I train.). Even so, I find my pistol drills lack a bit of structure and I’ve not made of habit of measuring my results against any standard; personal or objective. I’ve decided to change that.

After today’s excellent discussion with the owner and one of his instructors at my local practical range, I’ll be using various military and law enforcement qualification courses of fire as training drills. The first one I’ll be using as a drill is the Federal Air Marshal Pistol Qualification.

The Federal Air Marshal Pistol Qualification

The drill is executed at 7 yards using the FBI UIT-CB target. Each string (except #3) is performed twice, using a competition shot timer to issue start signals and to log the string times (and, if you’re really keeping track of things: the time between multiple shots).

Drill – each is performed twice From Par Time
One round concealed holster 1.65 seconds
Double tap low ready 1.35 seconds
Rhythm: fire 6 rounds at one target (1x only) low ready 3.00 seconds
On shot, speed reload, one shot low ready 3.25 seconds
One round each at 2 targets three yards apart low ready 1.65 seconds
Pivot 180°: One round each at 3 targets three yards apart – 1x turn left, 1x turn right concealed holster 3.50 seconds
One round, slide locks back, drop to one knee, reload, fire one round low ready 4.00 seconds

By recording my hits/misses and times, I’ll be able to find my trouble spots and track progress against an objective pressure standard.

Resources

If you’d like to train with this drill and keep track of your performance, here are a couple things you might like:

Here’s someone running the drill:

Weekend Workout 2: Five By Three

by Andy Rutledge 0 Comments

This week’s practical-range drill is run from concealment, featuring and aerobic workout and multiple small targets from three different distances: 7 yards, 17 yards, and 25 yards.

The Drill: Five by Three

  • Targets: Three 8-inch steel plates (or paper equivalent), placed 3 yards apart
  • Course of Fire: 25-yard range needed. 3 shots from each position – run from concealment – will include speed reloads between positions
  • Par Time: 26 seconds.

3 x 5 drill by andy rutledge

Important Notes

Use a shot timer and measure your time. The par time is 26 seconds, but aim to improve on each run.

You can see from the drill schematic that you will be moving both away from and toward the targets. Pay particular attention to your muzzle discipline while moving away from the targets—keep your muzzle pointed at the berm (behind you)!

Note also that you will need either a double magazine holder or two magazine pouches or a single mag pouch with the #3 magazine in your pocket (OR both extra mags in your pockets – not recommended).

The Drill

Set up three 8″ steel plates on stands—or three equivalent paper targets—three yards apart at 25 yards downrange. Place a barrel or some other conspicuous marker at 7 yards away from the targets and another at 17 yards away from the targets. Your main/furthest firing line should be at 25 yards away from the targets.

  1. Load 3 magazines: 3 rounds, 6 rounds, and 6 rounds respectively.
  2. Put the 3-round mag in your gun and chamber a round. Re-holster your pistol in your concealed holster. Place the other magazines in your mag pouch(es) and/or in your pocket(s). Your pistol and magazines should all be concealed.
  3. Start at the targets. Queue your shot timer. At the beep, sprint to position 1 (7 yards from the targets), turn, draw from concealment and fire 1 round at each target. Your gun should lock open, empty.
  4. Drop your magazine, turn and sprint to position 2 (17 yards from the targets) while you retrieve your next magazine.
  5. When you reach position 2, turn and reload and fire 1 shot at each target.
  6. Turn and sprint to position 3 (the 25-yard line). Be sure to keep your muzzle pointed at the berm behind you!
  7. At the 25-yard line, turn and fire 1 shot at each of the targets. Your slide will lock back as you run empty.
  8. Drop your mag and sprint back to position 2 as you retrieve your last magazine.
  9. Reload and fire 1 shot at each of the targets from position 2.
  10. Sprint to position 1 and fire 1 shot at each of the targets.

Note and record your time. Retrieve your dropped magazines.

Final Notes

Do at least 10 repeats on this drill. The drill will give you a good aerobic workout and test your ability to engage in precision shooting while your heart rate is up and while you have the pressure of the clock.

This is a precision drill, with the target areas being only 8″ in diameter. This is an effective target area for incapacitation and it is the maximum you should ever train to hit no matter your drill. Smaller targets are a good motivation for you to focus when aiming & shooting. Always opt for the smaller target in training.

The par time I’ve set here is 26 seconds, but aim to get below 20 seconds with 100% hit rate. If you compare this to a real-life situation where you’re required to save your own life from 3 armed assailants, note that you have the rest of your life to make accurate hits. Take all the time you require, but know that your life hangs in the balance.

Keep training hard. Training works. Responsibility is a thing™.

My Firearms Training – Annual Report for 2015

I train. A lot. I also keep detailed records of my training and gun-specific data.

In 2015 I trained on 221 of the 365 days of the year. I shot an average of 203 rounds per training session. That amounts to 47,480 rounds fired in 2015 (not counting simunition or dry-fire training).

As I did last year, I put these stats—and several others—into an infographic annual report. Here goes…

 

Andy Rutledge firearms training annual report

Weekend Workout 1: Double Triangle

by Andy Rutledge 0 Comments

Every weekend I’m at the practical range for one or two days working on technical accuracy and/or gun handling drills for pistol and carbine. For pistol, which is what I’ll talk about here, these drills usually involve multi-target drills, barricade drills, weak-hand / strong-hand shoot/reload drills, various mag-exchange drills, high-heart-rate-accuracy drills…or a combination of some or all of those. All are run from concealment.

I train 100% from concealment because that’s the only way I’ll ever deploy my pistol against any real threat. The result of my 2015 training has been 65+ practical-drill training sessions of no less than 200 rounds. Each training session averages 30-60 live-fire draws from concealment and 40-80 magazine exchanges from concealment. I tend to keep my magazine loads minimal for drills so as to maximize opportunities for mag exchange reps.

When I get an entire bay to myself I like to run multi-distance drills. I thought I’d start sharing some of my training drills so here’s the one I ran today, where I got in 10 repetitions. I call it Double Triangle.

 

andy rutledge's double-triangle drill

 

Double Triangle

It’s a drill for medium-range engagement. This drill allows you to practice:

  • sprinting to a position then steadying your platform for accurate shots
  • medium-range accuracy
  • magazine exchanges
  • muzzle discipline
  • managing accuracy as your heart rate climbs

Done right, your heart rate should be pretty damn high for the last couple of positions’ shots.

For this drill you need a 25-yard bay and quite a bit of room side to side. You’ll put 2 hits on target (steel–so you can hear your hits/misses) each from six positions. Makeup any misses immediately and exchange magazines as needed. The total required hits is 12 and you’ll have 14 rounds total loaded, so you can’t miss more than twice in the drill. If you run dry or are otherwise unable to put 2 hits on target from each position, that run is a FAIL. I find it’s best if you use steel so that you can hear your hits.

Place one barrel at 18 yards in the middle and two barrels at 7 yards, each 8-12 yards left and right of the target. You will shoot from the 25 yard line and from behind each of the barrels.

Magazine loadout is: 4 rounds in the pistol (1 chambered + 3), and 5 rounds each in 2 mags on your belt or in your pocket.

Use a shot timer. At the beep, sprint to position 1. NOTE: beginners should draw from concealment at the beep and then sprint to position 1. Those experienced at live-fire drills from concealment should sprint to position 1 and then draw from concealment. Put 2 hits on target, then sprint to the next position, etc…

BE SURE TO KEEP YOUR MUZZLE POINTED DOWNRANGE AT ALL TIMES. Be especially careful of your muzzle when running from the 18-yard position back to the 25-yard position. Also KEEP YOUR FINGER OFF OF THE TRIGGER EXCEPT WHEN YOUR SIGHTS ARE ON TARGET.

Do 6 – 10 reps for your workout.

Scoring:
Add one second for each hit outside of the “A” zone.

Par Time:
30 seconds (or better)

Variations

  1. Require left hand only for positions 1 & 2 and right hand only for positions 4 & 5
  2. Add more difficulty by requiring 1-handed magazine exchanges
  3. Add barricades and make it a cover drill

Give it a try!

Required Glock Modifications for Everyday Carry

Required Glock Modifications for Everyday Carry

I believe that a Glock is the perfect fighting pistol. I do mean “a” Glock because individuals have varied preference with regard to pistol size and caliber. With a specific size and caliber, though, I hold that Glock is the best pistol to have at hand when self defense against a deadly threat is necessary.

glock logo

However, while the manufacturer’s promotional phrase is “Glock PERFECTION,” I can agree only in part. The out-of-the-box Glock is by no means perfection. My opinion is that Glock doesn’t so much make the perfect pistol as they make the perfect pistol hobby kit. Specific alteration is required in order to achieve perfection.

While I’d argue a Glock is head and shoulders above any other EDC-candidate pistol, I believe it is very unwise to carry any Glock pistol without a few necessary modifications.

Sights

There is nothing wrong with Glock’s stock sights with regard to sighting. If you can’t shoot quickly and accurately with the stock sights, the problem is not with them, but with you. That said, plastic sights are beyond useless to the point of liability when it comes to running a fighting/defensive gun.

Glock’s plastic stock sights should immediately be replaced with iron sights, of whatever configuration works best for you. I’d recommend that the rear sight not be of the sloped variety, but instead have a squared-off profile that is perpendicular to the slide in order to facilitate one-handed slide racking on a belt or table or tree or whatever is at hand when the need arises.

sights

Avoid the sloping rear sight popular with some models. The slope makes 1-handed slide racking more difficult.

Frame and Grip

There are some who find fault with the finger ridges on the front of the grip of most Glock models. I’m not one of them, as these finger ridges perfectly mesh with my hand and I like that. What is problematic, however, is the fact that only the Gen 4 model’s (and the now-discontinued RTF frame) grip offers sufficient texture for good hand purchase while firing. More disappointing and especially dangerous is the fact that with wet hands (if it’s raining, if your palms are sweaty, or if your hands are bloody from fighting), it’s quite difficult to hold onto and manipulate a Glock pistol in defensive action. Even with the rougher Gen 4 grip.

I therefore hold that it is very unwise to carry a Glock pistol (or any pistol, for that matter) without either sandpaper grips or a stippling job. And I think adding adhesive grips is the wrong way to approach this issue. I stipple the frame of every one of my Glock pistols, as I have found anything added to the grip will come off in a very short time with any significant amount of training use (you do train, don’t you?). Some see stippling as a stylistic embellishment. I find it’s a required functional modification; a deal breaker for EDC. Stippling results in a frame that you can grip wet or dry without fail.

g30s_stippled_right

The Glock frame made perfect: Stippling to add the required texture and a Dremmel job on the right side of the frame where the grip meets the trigger guard.

Another necessary modification is rounding off the right hand side (for right-handed shooters) of the area connecting the grip with the trigger guard. This is where the strong hand middle finger is held firmly against the frame and vice-locked even tighter by the force of the support hand. Out of the box, this area is quite squared off and very un-ergonomic and it requires remedy in order to avoid severe discomfort after shooting more than ~20 rounds (if this doesn’t hurt your finger, you’re not gripping your pistol tightly enough).

The Dremmel-driven modification here is not so much an undercutting of the trigger guard as it is a rounding of the side transition, where the middle-finger’s first knuckle will go. The result is a fantastic boon to grip comfort.

Trigger

I find the Glock trigger to be decent, but by no means great. Some models tend to have better ones, like the Glock 43. The 43’s trigger is perhaps the best Glock trigger I’ve ever felt, but it is still a bit too heavy for my taste. Generally, though, a Glock’s trigger needs some work.

I’ve tried various trigger mods on various Glocks, utilizing connectors, springs, and plungers. What I find is best is to simply replace the stock connector with a 3.5 lb. connector. This replacement brings the trigger weight to around 4.5 pounds, which I prefer (you’d need to install the related trigger spring and striker safety plunger spring in order to get a 3.5 lb. trigger, which I do not recommend). More importantly, though, it gives the trigger a smoother take up and cleaner break and reset.

gtriggerconn

One caveat: 3.5 lb. connectors are not created equal. Glock’s 3.5 lb. connector is pretty decent, but there are better ones. My favorites come from Ghost Inc. and I favor either the Rocket or the EVO Elite connectors. I prefer the Rocket connector, but either requires fitting with a file, along with several assembly-test-disassembly-refit cycles.

Connector or spring replacement aside, I recommend NO polishing or grinding or other modification whatsoever to the trigger/striker system.

Popular Mods to Avoid

The wide and varied availability of aftermarket components for Glock pistols makes it easy for folks to go overboard and turn their perfect hobby kit into a silly caricature of a fighting pistol, often greatly reducing its practical functionality.

Avoid extended side-lock levers
The extended slide-lock lever was born of the mistaken idea that it’s a “slide release” lever. This mechanism was never meant to function as a slide release, which is why its external component is properly almost flush with the frame. It’s only purpose is to allow for the occasional need for the knuckle of your thumb to press upward on it to lock open the slide. One need never press down on the external lever. An extended lever gets in the way, often preventing the slide from locking open with the last round of the magazine. Moreover, it encourages the bad habit of using the lever to release the slide—which should only ever be accomplished by gripping the slide with the support hand and powering the frame forward with the strong hand to send the slide home.

Avoid titanium striker safety plungers
Titanium striker safety plungers are light and smooth and, therefore, valued by some as an upgrade for their Glock pistol. The opposite is true. These plungers attract carbon buildup which adheres easily and strongly to the top of the plunger, obviating any smoothness that was there. Moreover, they tend to deteriorate quickly with use, turning a vital safety mechanism into a liability.

Never, ever use a slide-plate “safety” device
One of the most important features of a Glock’s superiority to most other pistols is the lack of external mechanisms beyond the flush slide-lock lever. The Glock has three vital and redundant internal safety features that make the Glock perhaps the safest pistol one could carry. External/thumb safety levers on pistols only ever endanger lives because they mislead people into dangerous habits and into believing that safety is enabled or disabled by a lever. This is a fatal fallacy.

A person is safe or unsafe. No pistol is ever safe or unsafe because, quality and internal mechanisms aside, gun safety is a willful human volition. Only the operator can be safe or unsafe with a firearm. Assumptions to the contrary are the cause of every negligent gun death and injury ever inflicted or sustained.

Adding an external “safety” gadget to a Glock is the worst possible modification a Glock owner could make. Doing so transforms the mechanically safest, best-quality firearm available into one that invites irresponsible and negligent assumptions and extra, needless considerations to those manipulating their pistol.

Never rely upon or utilize a safety gadget on a pistol. Adhering to the 4 rules of firearm safety is the ONLY way to avoid killing or injuring yourself or someone else. No external lever can make a negligent person safe. Safety is 100% on people. When people forget this fact, people die.

Perfection

So there you have it: what I deem to be the required modifications for any EDC Glock pistol, along with a few to definitely avoid. I’m completely serious when I say that every one of them—both the ones to get and the ones to avoid—is a 100% deal breaker.

If you own and carry a Glock pistol, I recommend without reservation that you make all of these required modifications to your carry gun and avoid all of the bad ones. Until the day Glock Inc. decides to do them at the factory, these mods are how you get Glock perfection.

Gun Safety Gadgets: Trading Safety for Absolution

absolution

Among quality firearms there is no such thing as an unsafe gun. A well-made firearm is just a tool. On the other hand, a person can be safe or unsafe, dangerous or harmless, responsible or negligent. These are human qualities. With regard to firearms, safety is governed by human behavior and not gadget settings. Yet, ridiculously, some people maintain that the existence or absence of a mechanical switch defines or governs the differences between these human qualities. These people may be sincere or merely demagogues, but the results of their distortions are equally destructive.

The sincere ones are motivated by their ignorance. The demagogues are motivated by any number of factors, including a desire to sell gadgets, a desire to harm the reputation of a particular firearms manufacturer, or even a desire to see all firearms banned. Perhaps most common, though, is the irresponsible, malevolent, and otherwise pathetic desire to hold others responsible for one’s own irrational fears.

Despite the lies some will deliberately tell you, no gadget or switch can make an unsafe person safe. But the gadget peddlers and tool blamers are not selling safety. They’re doing something else entirely.

Absolution

Ego te absolvo a peccatis tuis…

Those who believe and evangelize the notion that safety is a mechanical setting are not seeking safety. They’re seeking absolution. They want to be absolved of their apprehensions and, just as important, they want to be absolved of responsibility. Worse, they want to legitimize their fictional and irresponsible idiom by endearing themselves to others who want the same things.

The kind of person who believes a gadget will make an unsafe person safe is also the kind of person who, when their negligence results in damage or harm, will blame anything or anyone other than themselves.

As to apprehension when handing a firearm, it is necessary, healthy; it means that you care. That apprehension reminds you to be responsible when loading, unloading, drawing, holstering, or otherwise manipulating a firearm. Without healthy, warranted apprehension, a person becomes careless. Gadgets and mechanisms that are meant to mitigate apprehension, by definition, cultivate carelessness and irresponsibility.

So just like the hoplophobes who believe their own irrational fears should be everyone’s concern and then seek to destroy civil rights and ban firearms, these gadgetophiles work to make themselves and others feel safer instead of be safer. In doing so, they dismiss and compromise actual safety in favor of the illusion of safety. Moreover, they deliberately cultivate irresponsibility and carelessness in themselves and encourage these failings in others.

Consequences

Absolved of apprehension and responsibility, people tend toward laziness and complacency. With respect to firearms, that laziness and complacency is negligence. After having purchased or relied upon a gadget or switch instead of responsibility and when their negligence leads to mishap, injury, or death, they have a scapegoat. Worse, in such cases, other weak-minded people seem all too willing to accept their pathetic and impossible excuses:

People hear and accept the lie:

Something failed! The damn thing just went off!

instead of the fact:

I failed to keep my finger off the trigger as I drew my pistol from the holster.

People hear and accept the lie:

Glocks are unsafe for law enforcement use!

instead of the fact:

Glocks are no more or less safe than any other quality firearm. The record clearly shows that law enforcement has a culture of gun-handling complacency and negligence.

People hear and accept the lie:

This gadget will make your gun safer; will keep you from shooting yourself or someone else.

instead of the fact:

Gun safety is a human habit/behavior, not a mechanical setting. No gadget or switch can make an unsafe person safe.

The fact that a gun cannot be negligent or unsafe becomes irrelevant in the face of hoplophobic absolution. As a result, people get rewarded for negligence or, at the very least, escape the proper consequences for it.

Rewarding negligence begets negligence.

Firearm safety cannot be ensured by a switch and it cannot be learned. It must be forged into habit by proper, rigorous, and ongoing training until one is habitually incapable of unsafe gun handling. Anyone who says different is selling something and is encouraging you toward negligence. Don’t buy it.

* * *

The title image is “The Confession,” by Giuseppe Molteni.

Review: Incog Eclipse IWB Holster

by Andy Rutledge 2 Comments

Appendix carry is seemingly becoming all the rage of late. At least that’s the impression I get based on conversations with friends and the articles and videos I see. I have to believe that part of the reason is that holsters for effective and comfortable carry in that position are getting better.

Enter the INCOG series of holsters. INCOG is a joint development projects between Haley Strategic Partners and G-Code Holsters. Their first product (that I’m aware of) was the INCOG Holster System, which offered a somewhat modular array of holster, mag holder, and belt clip arrangements. The INCOG Eclipse IWB holster is tailored more specifically for the mid-line or appendix-carry position.

Features

While not overly thick, the Kydex for the Eclipse is a bit thicker than most holsters I’ve seen. Sturdy. As most are, the Kydex is molded to the pistol model, which allows for positive retention without an over-tight retention adjustment (it’s adjustable). The interior is very slick and smooth.

The edges of the Kydex are very smooth. While other holsters have smooth, rounded edges, they tend to them leave a sharp ridge where the rounded edge meets the flat surface. Not so with the Eclipse; they did a proper job of smoothing things out for our comfort.

The exterior, like all INCOG holsters, is covered in what G-Code calls Tactical Fuzz. This covering basically makes the holster’s exterior feel like suede. This grippy texture aids in comfort when worn without an undershirt and helps keep the holster in place when worn with an undershirt.

Incog Eclipse holster

incog2

incog3

incog4

You’ll notice in the photos that the belt clip is angled. The adjustable Super MoJo adapter has this angle to press the holster away from the belt and into your body, which aids in concealment. I can attest that this feature does work, as it renders my Eclipse more concealable than other, more minimal holsters that don’t have this spring-like effect.

The clip is plastic and seems to have good strength and position memory. The business end of the belt clip is strongly angled for good belt grip. It even has a handy tab for easy removal when you’re ready to disarm.

incog mojos

Here’s a detail of the Super MoJo clip attachment (from the G-Code website). It allows you to adjust the position and angle of the belt clip on the holster to account for proper balance for your specific pistol and preference.

Carry

I’ve carried my Glock 26 with the Eclipse for a little more than a month and I find it to be highly concealable. Appendix carry is not always comfortable per se, but having used three or four other holsters in this position, I find the Eclipse to be among the more comfortable.

I have worn it while visiting the mall, driving my truck, raking leaves in the yard, even cleaning house. Most of the time I forget that I’m wearing it. On a very important point, some holster made for mid-line or appendix carry do not offer full access to the grip of your pistol. The Eclipse does.

wearing the Incog holster

As you can see, a compact pistol under a t-shirt is quite easy to conceal with the Eclipse. Here, I’m wearing my Glock 26 in the appendix position.

carrying the Incog holster

Incog holster

Incog holster

Conclusion

I’ve used several different holsters for appendix-position carry; both those made specifically for it and those that are otherwise suitable for that position. My experience shows that the INCOG Eclipse is the most concealable, and among the most comfortable of the lot.

The Kydex is slick inside and quite thick (read: durable) and the Tactical Fuzz does seem to be a positive and useful feature, despite the silly name. The belt clip is excellent and employs a springy strategy that other holsters haven’t yet caught onto. In short, this one works. I give it a thumbs up. Also, I’ll keep wearing it.

* * *

Photos of the holster by the author
Photos of the author by Evan Rutledge

Glock 19 Report: 30,000 Rounds In

by Andy Rutledge 0 Comments
Glock 19 Report: 30,000 Rounds In

I purchased my Glock 19 Gen4 in mid December, 2013; just about one year ago. In this past year since purchase, I’ve put more than 30,000 rounds through it in training and competition. In those 30K+ rounds, for every round I fed into the pistol, I pulled the trigger it went “bang.” Every round fired every time.

While most of the ammo I’ve fired through this pistol was Federal white box and Freedom Munitions 115gr ball ammo, and a lot of Copper-Matrix NTF frangible rounds, I have also fired hundreds of defensive rounds from Remington, Federal, Winchester, Hornady, and Speer—including hollow point and plastic-filled/tipped rounds of 115, 124, and 147 grain.

With every brand, grain, and type of round fire, not even one single failure:

  • No stovepipes
  • No failures to feed
  • No double feeds

Running my Glock 19 in competition.
Above: Running my Glock 19 in competition.

There was a stretch around 10,000 rounds or so where I tried an after market recoil spring that turned out to be too light for this pistol. The result was a tendency to delay going into full battery for a second or so after some shots. I remedied this issue by going back to a stock recoil spring. Even in that period of after-market folly, every round chambered and fired (and never an anomaly of any kind using a stock spring).

With 30K rounds fired in less than one year, that means that I’ve fired at least 600 rounds per week, every week, with just this pistol; one of several that I own and train regularly with.

Parts Replacements

As is advisable, I have replaced the recoil spring a few times (two of those was with the aforementioned and ill-fated after-market springs). The current spring is only a few thousand rounds in and is a stock, Gen4 spring. As this Glock 19 is my primary competition gun, I replaced the trigger connector and springs in favor of a 3.5 lb setup after about 10,000 rounds. I have replaced the trigger spring twice, each after about 10,000 rounds (and it’s likely time to do so again, now). I also replaced the slide release lever with an extended model, yet find I almost never use it.

While I don’t mind the configuration of Glock’s stock sights, I do not like or use plastic sights so I replaced these with Glock factory tritium night sights. Sights have to be durable and stand up to punishment. Iron over plastic every time.

glock 19

Report Conclusions

I believe the Glock 19 is an almost perfect pistol, given its reliability, size, capacity, concealability, and general suitability for everyday carry and for competition. Given the competition-friendly modifications I made to mine, I no longer use my Glock 19 as an EDC, but I use it a couple times a month for competition and train with it quite a bit at both the target range and the practical range.

I’m a bit fastidious with regard to cleaning and upkeep, but my G19 functions as well and looks as good today, after 30K rounds, as it did when it had just 500 rounds through it. I would recommend the Glock 19 as anyone’s first pistol purchase and as a must-have for every pistol enthusiast’s collection.