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A Little Fun With the Kel-Tek KSG

by Andy Rutledge 0 Comments

This weekend I spent some quality time and a bunch of shells shooting the Kel-Tek KSG 12 gauge shotgun for an upcoming review. This thing is a blast to shoot (ha) and I’m a big fan of the size of this perfect-home-defense shotgun. Far more maneuverable and easier to wield than my Mossberg 500A, especially in tight quarters.

Here (vid below) you can see how it is much like shooting a small carbine or SBR with regard to maneuverability.

Review later this month on the Eagle Gun Range blog.

Escape Drill #2

by Andy Rutledge 0 Comments
Escape Drill #2

I tend to use escape drills often because it’s likely that my first response to real danger will be to try and get away. When/if I discover I cannot escape because of pursuit and/or being under fire, I may have to stop the threat from cover and/or while moving.

The Drill

  • At the beep, run away from two bad guys toward cover
  • Draw from concealment and defend with two rounds on each while standing behind small/thin cover
  • Gun runs empty
  • Exchange magazines while running to better cover and defend against a third bad guy you didn’t see earlier

My time here was 11:38.

Escape Drill #1

by Andy Rutledge 0 Comments
Escape Drill #1

Premise is: you’re escaping from two active shooters. You run to cover and disable Bad Guy #1 with two rounds to the upper chest, then run to 25 yards away and disable Bad Guy #2 with a head shot.

The Drill

  • At the beep, run to the 10-yard barrel, draw from concealment, and fire 2 shots to torso from cover
  • Run back to the 25-yard line and put one round on the 8″ target

My time here was about 8 seconds.

Three Targets with Reload From Concealment

Three Targets with Reload From Concealment

Here’s a drill run from concealment using standard EDC kit.

The drill I concentrated on is a 6-shot drill, using 3 targets at 10 yards, spaced 3 yards apart. My target area is typically a paper plate (as shown below). The drill goes as follows:

  • At the beep (time), draw from concealment while moving “off the X”
  • Engage each target with one shot (slide locks back, empty)
  • Draw replacement magazine from concealment while moving “off the X,” all while keeping eyes on last target
  • Reload, rack the slide to charge the pistol
  • Re-engage the targets in reverse order
  • Check the environment (around and behind you)

Time for the drill should be less than 6 seconds.

My best time today (with accurate hits) was 4.81 seconds.

3 targets at 10 yards, 3-yards apart

Above: Three targets 10 yards away, spaced 3 yards apart. The target area for each is one of the paper plates.

Shooting Drill: The Federal Air Marshal Pistol Qualification

by Andy Rutledge 0 Comments
Shooting Drill: The Federal Air Marshal Pistol Qualification

If you’re anything like me, you’re always looking for ways to use the range facilities at your disposal in the most productive ways possible. At my indoor range, for instance, I cannot draw from a holster and the narrow shooting lanes prohibit all but the smallest body dynamics. So there I work on mag-exchange drills, hand drills, and plain ol target practice.

When I get to my local outdoor practical range there is very little I cannot do, but I have a hard time settling on specific drills to work. Despite the fact that I’m a competitive shooter, I only ever use my concealed carry holster and pistols when working on pistol drills there (Since my daily carry setup is concealed, that’s how I train.). Even so, I find my pistol drills lack a bit of structure and I’ve not made of habit of measuring my results against any standard; personal or objective. I’ve decided to change that.

After today’s excellent discussion with the owner and one of his instructors at my local practical range, I’ll be using various military and law enforcement qualification courses of fire as training drills. The first one I’ll be using as a drill is the Federal Air Marshal Pistol Qualification.

The Federal Air Marshal Pistol Qualification

The drill is executed at 7 yards using the FBI UIT-CB target. Each string (except #3) is performed twice, using a competition shot timer to issue start signals and to log the string times (and, if you’re really keeping track of things: the time between multiple shots).

Drill – each is performed twice From Par Time
One round concealed holster 1.65 seconds
Double tap low ready 1.35 seconds
Rhythm: fire 6 rounds at one target (1x only) low ready 3.00 seconds
On shot, speed reload, one shot low ready 3.25 seconds
One round each at 2 targets three yards apart low ready 1.65 seconds
Pivot 180°: One round each at 3 targets three yards apart – 1x turn left, 1x turn right concealed holster 3.50 seconds
One round, slide locks back, drop to one knee, reload, fire one round low ready 4.00 seconds

By recording my hits/misses and times, I’ll be able to find my trouble spots and track progress against an objective pressure standard.

Resources

If you’d like to train with this drill and keep track of your performance, here are a couple things you might like:

Here’s someone running the drill: