Condition: Yellow - responsible preparation, and fun, for an unpredictable world

Category Archives

7 Articles

Report: Relentless Tactical’s Ultimate Concealed Carry Belt

For everyday wear I prefer a normal-looking leather belt as opposed to a tactical-style belt. Though I carry several EDC items on my belt, I want the easy-on, easy-off, normal buckle that a traditional-looking belt offers, but it can be hard to find this style of leather belt that is stiff enough to serve as an EDC belt.

About seven months ago I purchased the “Ultimate Concealed Carry Belt” from Relentless Tactical. Since then, it has been the only belt I’ve worn every day while carrying a Glock 19, 2 spare mags in a Kydex double mag pouch, iPhone in a Kydex phone pouch, and a TDI knife in a belt-clip holder.

 

RT Ultimate Concealed Carry Belt

 

I find the belt to be attractive and, even with the weave pattern I chose, in no way gaudy. The color is a good brown; neither too red nor too dark for my taste (the belt also comes in black). The edges are smooth and textured well with a dark burnished finish.

When looped once in your hand, the belt will not form a flat rigid ring like many steel or Kydex-core range belts, but the belt is stiff top to bottom. It is impossible to bend the leather from edge to edge. This is an imperative quality for a gun belt.

As I mentioned earlier I carry two magazines, a phone, and at least one knife on my belt in addition to my Glock 19 pistol. With this loadout, the belt has always felt and performed up to the task during the past seven months of every-day wear. I am very happy with the function.

 

Above: This is my normal everyday-carry loadout, 365 days per year. I typically wear an un-tucked shirt, which suffices for easy and complete concealment.

 

Leather belts wear and typically become softer over time. I wondered how this belt would hold up to both softening and to the wear of several Kydex loops and clips. While there is some wear, the exterior wear is not terrible thus far. Wear is minimal at the buckle and hole area; only a crease with no discoloration or cracking of the leather. The belt has completely held its edge-to-edge rigidity.

 

EDC belt

 

The only external wear showing is on the left side where my Kydex mag pouch rides. The interior of the belt loops have sandpaper to keep the the pouch from moving along the belt line. Even so, only one loop area shows wear. It’s not too bad, but there is some discoloration, as you can see below:

 

edc belt wear

 

I have not yet polished this belt and I expect that with a light polish this mild discoloration could be mitigated considerably.

Overall I’m very happy with the Ultimate Concealed Carry Belt from Relentless Tactical and I have no complaints to report. They have a steel-core belt coming soon and I expect I will give that one a try, as it will have the benefit of loop rigidity. In the mean time, I’m not looking for anything else. This belt gets a thumbs up from me.

IGFS Enhanced Duty Trigger – Failure After 19K Rounds

Since October of 2016 I’ve been running the IGFS Enhanced Duty Trigger in my EDC Glock 19. The action and function of this trigger was excellent and I was very happy with it in my carry pistol. The flat face makes for a more consistent press action and I find it easier to employ proper mechanics than with the stock Glock trigger.

While doing dry-fire practice this week I noticed that the trigger felt different and took a good long look at it. That’s when I saw that the safety tab was rather shallow on the trigger shoe. I confirmed that the safety mechanism no longer prevented the trigger from being improperly pressed to the rear. Not good!

This is the promo photo for the trigger. Notice that the safety tab protrudes prominently.

 

Here (below) is my IGFS Enhanced Duty Trigger after being installed on my Glock 19 last October. Notice here that the safety tab is prominent. I did confirm then that the safety mechanism worked properly.

IGFS Trigger

 

In the seven months that followed I carried this pistol all day, every day, and trained with it 3 to 4 days per week. I shot 19,000 rounds in that time and thoroughly enjoyed the trigger.

But here (below) is the trigger today after 19,000 rounds, 7 months after installation. The trigger safety no longer protrudes enough to keep the trigger from improper engagement. I inspected the trigger assembly for any impediments or damage and could find nothing. My conclusion is that the spring that engages the safety tab just wore out from use.

 

As you can see here (below), the trigger safety should be protruding more in the front so that the rear catch is exposed enough to engage and prevent the trigger from being improperly pressed to the rear.

 

Here (below) you can see where the mechanism is supposed to be when not engaged. Thousands of trigger presses just wore out the safety spring. No bueno.

IGFS Trigger fail

I contacted IGFS and told them about this. they responded to say that they’ve never heard of such a failure and will replace the trigger. That was a few days ago and I have no return or replacement details yet. I will report when I know more.

I like the IGFS Enhanced Duty Trigger and would like to continue to run it in my EDC gun. But I’d like to know that they’ve addressed this specific issue. This trigger is specifically for Glock pistols, which are known for 100% reliability. This component would not seem to fit the standards. For now it’s back to the stock Glock trigger that came with this pistol. I have stock Glock triggers with 60k+ rounds of use that exhibit no safety malfunction whatever. IGFS should do better.

Shooting Review: The Canik TP9 SA

by Andy Rutledge 0 Comments

While getting performance and quality on a budget is a goal for many first-time gun buyers, the reality is difficult or impossible to achieve. The TP9 SA seems to be the first legitimate answer to that quest in a full-size pistol.

In addition to the low price, the TP9 SA has several positive qualities that make it worthy of consideration, including interchangeable backstraps, eighteen rounds of 9mm in high-quality magazines, and perhaps the best trigger you’ll find on any striker-fired pistol at any price. I’m not kidding.

Read the rest of my review at the Eagle Gun Range blog »

Canik TP9 SA

Shooting Review: The Sig Sauer P320 Carry

by Andy Rutledge 0 Comments

Since I have for some time had my carry weapon system locked in, I don’t spend much effort trying to find the next pistol I want to buy. But once in a while a worthwhile innovation makes me sit up, take notice, and contemplate reconsidering my carry platform. The Sig P320 is one of these and I’ve been waiting with great anticipation to get my hands on a model other than the full size to try out…

Continue reading my review on the Eagle Gun Range blog »

Sig P320

Review: Incog Eclipse IWB Holster

by Andy Rutledge 2 Comments

Appendix carry is seemingly becoming all the rage of late. At least that’s the impression I get based on conversations with friends and the articles and videos I see. I have to believe that part of the reason is that holsters for effective and comfortable carry in that position are getting better.

Enter the INCOG series of holsters. INCOG is a joint development projects between Haley Strategic Partners and G-Code Holsters. Their first product (that I’m aware of) was the INCOG Holster System, which offered a somewhat modular array of holster, mag holder, and belt clip arrangements. The INCOG Eclipse IWB holster is tailored more specifically for the mid-line or appendix-carry position.

Features

While not overly thick, the Kydex for the Eclipse is a bit thicker than most holsters I’ve seen. Sturdy. As most are, the Kydex is molded to the pistol model, which allows for positive retention without an over-tight retention adjustment (it’s adjustable). The interior is very slick and smooth.

The edges of the Kydex are very smooth. While other holsters have smooth, rounded edges, they tend to them leave a sharp ridge where the rounded edge meets the flat surface. Not so with the Eclipse; they did a proper job of smoothing things out for our comfort.

The exterior, like all INCOG holsters, is covered in what G-Code calls Tactical Fuzz. This covering basically makes the holster’s exterior feel like suede. This grippy texture aids in comfort when worn without an undershirt and helps keep the holster in place when worn with an undershirt.

Incog Eclipse holster

incog2

incog3

incog4

You’ll notice in the photos that the belt clip is angled. The adjustable Super MoJo adapter has this angle to press the holster away from the belt and into your body, which aids in concealment. I can attest that this feature does work, as it renders my Eclipse more concealable than other, more minimal holsters that don’t have this spring-like effect.

The clip is plastic and seems to have good strength and position memory. The business end of the belt clip is strongly angled for good belt grip. It even has a handy tab for easy removal when you’re ready to disarm.

incog mojos

Here’s a detail of the Super MoJo clip attachment (from the G-Code website). It allows you to adjust the position and angle of the belt clip on the holster to account for proper balance for your specific pistol and preference.

Carry

I’ve carried my Glock 26 with the Eclipse for a little more than a month and I find it to be highly concealable. Appendix carry is not always comfortable per se, but having used three or four other holsters in this position, I find the Eclipse to be among the more comfortable.

I have worn it while visiting the mall, driving my truck, raking leaves in the yard, even cleaning house. Most of the time I forget that I’m wearing it. On a very important point, some holster made for mid-line or appendix carry do not offer full access to the grip of your pistol. The Eclipse does.

wearing the Incog holster

As you can see, a compact pistol under a t-shirt is quite easy to conceal with the Eclipse. Here, I’m wearing my Glock 26 in the appendix position.

carrying the Incog holster

Incog holster

Incog holster

Conclusion

I’ve used several different holsters for appendix-position carry; both those made specifically for it and those that are otherwise suitable for that position. My experience shows that the INCOG Eclipse is the most concealable, and among the most comfortable of the lot.

The Kydex is slick inside and quite thick (read: durable) and the Tactical Fuzz does seem to be a positive and useful feature, despite the silly name. The belt clip is excellent and employs a springy strategy that other holsters haven’t yet caught onto. In short, this one works. I give it a thumbs up. Also, I’ll keep wearing it.

* * *

Photos of the holster by the author
Photos of the author by Evan Rutledge