Condition: Yellow - responsible preparation, and fun, for an unpredictable world

Category Archives

60 Articles

25-Yard Heart-Rate Drill on 7″ Steel

Any good shooter can take their time and get 100% accuracy, but this is exploring boundaries. With this drill I’m working to get fast, accurate shots while moving dynamically between them and while my heart rate is climbing with each shot. My six misses (!) in this drill are testament to the difficulty of managing fatigue and speed at the edge of my current ability. The point is to push boundaries and improve with time.

7″ steel plate from 25 yards.

– Draw from concealment while moving off the X and put 1 round on the 7″ plate,
– Run around the obstacle and put another round on the 7″ plate,
– Repeat until magazine runs dry,
– Perform a speed reload while moving away, scan an assess, re-holster.

You can do a 1-mag (15 shots) or 2-mag (30 shots) drill. It’s important to ignore fatigue and any frustration from misses and continue no matter what, until you’re empty.

Run Your EDC Weapon System

EDC weapon system

You carry concealed: pistol, holster, mag pouch, extra mags, weapon light. You carry every day without fail and train so that you can hit what you’re aiming at should the situation require it.

I maintain that this is not enough.

Your EDC rig is a complement of components that you HAVE to know how to run and manipulate given any circumstance and under all sorts of conditions. Ideally this means:

  • Knowing without a doubt—without thinking—what condition your weapon is in at every given moment should you have to draw and engage (Should never vary. Ever.)
  • Ability for immediate draw from concealment and first shot(s) on vital target in less than 2 seconds (less than 1 is better)
  • Ability to exchange magazines (reload) and fire accurately again in under 2 seconds
  • Doing all of this after your strong (or weak) arm has been incapacitated
  • Ability to manage your weapon light and place rounds on vital target under duress in darkness while maintaining tactical advantage
  • Ability to immediately manage any malfunction and get back into the fight in under 2 seconds: one-handed or two handed
  • Ability to hit small targets (eyes & nose) at 25 yards quickly (less than 2 seconds is best)
  • Ability to do all of this while running oblique towards or away from your target, while being shot at, while seeking or from behind cover
  • Knowing what your holster feels like when there is the slightest obstruction while re-holstering

The times referenced here are optimal. They’re what you should work toward. Regardless of the strict times, If you cannot do these things like a boss, you need more training from qualified instructors and heaps and gobs of practice. Continually.

Or what was it you thought you were doing, carrying a gun?

Harsh? Not near as harsh as what’ll happen if you’re ever required to depend on these skills you in no way possess.

If you’re in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area, hit me up and I’ll try and direct you toward proper resources to set you on the right path. Happy to help!

Breaktime

Spent the morning working move-draw-shoot drills from concealment today. At 15 yards I’m averaging 1.34 seconds for consistent half-A-zone hits. At 10 yards, I’m hovering around 1.15 seconds. Had a couple at 1.07 today (w/o the move off the X).

I carry my Glock 19 as deep as my holster will go, so I really have to horse the gun out of my pants with little more than thumb and pinky. If I carried with the full grip exposed above my belt I’d want my times to be a bit faster. As it is I’m pretty happy with these times from concealment.

gun, holster, ammo, timer

EDC Knife: CRKT Outrage

by Andy Rutledge 0 Comments

This is a knife I recently acquired as an everyday carry. I picked it up for a couple of reasons, including the fact that it’s a Ken Onion design and the fact that the blade belly is interesting and seemingly efficacious. I’ve carried it for a couple of months and really dig the low profile in the pocket (note the clip position) and the ease of opening.

It’s a flipper and the action is very nice. The handle is a textured 6061 aluminum with a 2Cr13 steel liner lock. The blade material is 8Cr13MoV steel and I just love the profile. It feels fantastic in the hand in both directions. Very happy with this purchase.

CRTK Outrage by Ken Onion

crtk-outrage1

crtk-outrage3

crtk-outrage4

crtk-outrage5

crtk-outrage6

crtk-outrage7

WEDC Chest Rig

by Andy Rutledge 0 Comments

Given that we are at war and that war may find any one of us at amy time, anywhere we normally go during the day or night, there are a few extra things I carry in my truck at all times. Among my wartime everyday carry (WEDC) in my vehicle is the Haley Strategic Disruptive Environments 762 heavy chest rig. In this case, it is not “heavy,” but loaded up with M4 magazines (which fit just fine) for my .300BLK rifle that is also with me at all times in the truck.

chest rig

WEDC Battle Belt

by Andy Rutledge 1 Comment

Wartime everyday carry (WEDC) is different from normal EDC. Aside from how it affects advisable on-body carry items, I believe it affects what you keep with you in your vehicle. Here’s my WEDC battle belt I keep in the truck at all times.

Wartime EDC: battle belt

It’s an HSGI rigger belt with a micro-grip (velcro) pad. I’m using ITW FastMag pouches for the carbine magazines, dump pouch, and the holster is (I think) an HSGI padded leg panel to which I’ve affixed a Bravo Concealment OWB holster that I replaced the belt loops with malice clips in order to affix it to the drop-leg pad. The holster accommodates the Surefire XC1 I have on my EDC Glock 19. The result is a minimalist and rock-solid drop-leg holster that rides very high (like it’s supposed to). Love it.

Responsibility and Concealed Carry

Responsibility and Concealed Carry

If you carry a concealed handgun, it means that you’re committing yourself to a few logical conclusions. In the event of a life-threatening event, carrying means you’re committed to:

  1. drawing a live weapon from concealment in the heat and chaos of a terrifying moment,
  2. doing so safely and competently, despite your adrenaline-compromised state of mind and physical mechanics, so as not to injure yourself or those nearby,
  3. bringing the weapon to bear while avoiding physical or projectile attack upon yourself,
  4. making the life-and-death decision to fire or not fire as the situation develops, moment to moment,
  5. putting rounds accurately on your target, should you deliberately choose to fire, avoiding endangering innocents in the vicinity,
  6. being able to properly decide when and if the threat has been stopped, and if there are other threats besides the initial one,
  7. and, when the danger has passed, re-holstering your live weapon safely.
 

Now, how many times/week do you train to do those things, at least the mechanical things? How many times per day do you draw your live, chambered weapon from concealment with speed and deliberate intent and bring it to bear on a target, and then re-holster back into your concealed holster?

drawing from an aiwb holster

What about doing all this with the t-shirt that is longer than others you wear; the shirt that’s a bit more clingy than your others; with the jacket you wear zipped in cool weather; with the heavy coat you have on you during winter; with the gloves you wear while outdoors? How many times do you train to speedily and competently draw your live, ready-to-fire weapon from concealment under these garments…and safely re-holster? How many hundreds of times each month? Because hundreds of times each month is what is required for gaining any semblance of competence.

I wonder if most concealed carriers think about these things. Any of them.

In my experience most concealed carriers imagine that when they feel the need to defend themselves, some nonspecific things will “happen” wherein their weapon will move, safely and surely, from concealment into the perfectly formed grip of their outstretched hands…and, after some quick and easy decision, the threat “will be neutralized.”

I could be wrong. Perhaps I’m prejudiced by the fact that of the people I know who carry concealed, very few of them spend any time at the range training to do or handle or examine any of the things listed above. But they should because unless you have practiced unconsciously correct mechanics and habits, when you try and bring a loaded weapon into play from concealment while under duress—or while trying to perform quickly in a practical training class—you’re likely going to mess up in one or several ways. You might possibly even shoot yourself or someone else due to your negligence in training and resultant incompetence.

I believe this is what will likely happen because gun owners tend to shoot themselves when they “try something;” something they should try time and time again, every week of every month of every year of their lives. But they don’t, so they shoot themselves in the groin or the hip or the leg.

Instead of doing what is responsibly required of someone who carries a deadly weapon, I believe most concealed carriers merely practice drawing and re-holstering at home (when trying out a new holster), with an unloaded weapon, and I believe only a relative few of them visit a gun range to practice more than a couple times a year. And when they do they’re standing statically in a bay, slowly firing ball ammo rounds at a static target 7 yards away. This, anyway, is what my acquaintance, observation, and conversations with other shooters proves to me.

My tone here may seem a bit harsh, but, to take from a political aphorism, concealed carry ain’t beanbag. It’s deadly serious stuff that directly impacts people’s lives and fortunes in all sorts of ways. I therefore believe that those who aren’t prepared to meet their responsibilities with respect to carrying a concealed weapon should stay out of it.

Untrained and incompetent firearms owners seem to shoot themselves or others quite often. I say quite often because that sort of thing should never happen, given how easy it is to be safe with a firearm. Easy, yes, but safety and competence each require work. Lots of work and on a regular basis. It’s easy, but so many don’t seem to bother with it; the required training to forge competence and safe habits, I mean.

A Few Tips

The way to not shoot yourself while drawing your handgun is to do so with your index (trigger) finger ramrod straight along first the holster, then the frame of the handgun. You then keep your finger ramrod straight along the side of the frame until your sights are on your target. You need to do this thousands of times, perfectly, so as to make it automatic. You need to do this so many times that you become unconsciously incapable of putting your finger anywhere else.

If you do not do this thousands of times, you will fail when your conscious mind is occupied by some immediate threat and your unconscious mind is screaming, “Find the trigger! Find the trigger! Shoooooot!” In that case, you’re likely to shoot yourself or the ground while drawing.

The way to not shoot yourself while re-holstering is to

  1. Look your weapon back into the holster. The whole way.
  2. Know the habits of your outer garments as they hang and behave while you’re holding them out of the way while re-holstering. Know this from your thousands of repetitions in training. Know this about all of the kinds of outer garments you wear; not just clothing types, but each of the specific individual shirts, jackets, coats, etc.
  3. Know the habits of your pants and undershirt, if you wear one. Know, from thousands of repetitions in training, how they may try and interfere with the opening of your holster; especially an IWB holster.
  4. Re-holster slowly and surely, and know (from thousands of repetitions in training) what it feels like when some unseen piece of fabric is in the way.
  5. Keep your index finger ramrod straight along the frame of the weapon the entire time, and keep your thumb on the back of the slide, so that it won’t be pushed out of battery by the holster or anything else.
  6. Replace your garments to their normal hang/position and know the feel (from thousands of repetitions in training) of something being a bit out of place.
 

Do all of these things perfectly for thousands of repetitions in training, all while obeying the 4 rules of firearm safety out of habit (developed through consistent, ongoing training around other people), and you will never shoot yourself. Fail to do things this way and you will eventually shoot yourself. I’d almost bet my mortgage on that.

Because incompetence…

Last year, firearms trainer Larry Vickers announced that he was banning AIWB (appendix-inside-the-waisband) carry from his classes. Why? Because most people don’t train enough and don’t train correctly. Given the fact that his classes are open to shooters of various skill levels, in his place I would likely do the same. Because unsafe people are unsafe.

In his announcement, Larry observed…

“I know of two different students in two different classes taught by two different instructors who have shot themselves reholstering – I don’t want my name added to that list.”

Indeed. And negligently shooting oneself in the groin area is perhaps more traumatic than shooting oneself in the hip or outer leg. However, what’s at issue here has nothing to do with carry position. Rather, as always, the only relevant issue is safety and competence. Unsafe people are unsafe and incompetent people are incompetent. You may know them by their repeated lack of training and practice.

How To Not Shoot Yourself: Train

The thing that separates safe and competent shooters from unsafe and incompetent shooters is ongoing, contextually appropriate training. By this, I mean training that involves (after sufficient, requisite safety and mechanics training) drills that require drawing a live weapon from concealment while moving off the X and engaging targets effectively…while around other people…and then safely re-holstering the live weapon. Then doing it all over again and again and again. Even better if drills involve moving to and/or using cover, and better still if they involve speed reloads from concealment (you do carry a spare mag, don’t you?).

In the absence of this training, a person lacks competence at every step, which is highly dangerous given that it all involves manipulating a deadly weapon while doing complex things. Drawing a live handgun from an inside-the-waistband holster is not in and of itself dangerous at all. But the fumbling, unsure hands of one whose conscious attention is occupied by an immediate threat or training objective, without benefit of automatic muscle memory and unconscious habits, turn that multi-step operation into a crap shoot (so to speak), fraught with deadly danger.

An Anecdote: My Training

I draw and re-holster my loaded and ready-to-fire pistol at least 480 times every month. At least 320 of those reps are done in live-fire training on the range, where I draw from my AIWB holster and engage one or more targets, then re-holster the still-loaded pistol (Note: it’s a bad idea to holster an empty firearm. If you deliberately or accidentally make a habit out of doing that, it may one day get you killed. Besides, since you MUST treat every firearm as though it is loaded, make damn sure it is always loaded. Any other habit sows the seeds of failure.).

Here’s an example (below) of a concealed-carry competence drill:

 

Every morning after arming myself, I perform at least two draws of my loaded, ready-to-fire weapon from concealment. Additionally, I perform at least two reps of drawing my replacement magazine. I do this so that, outside of any range training I’ve done, I have a practiced understanding of how these clothes are best manipulated in drawing from concealment, today. I then do the same thing at the end of the day when taking off my weapon. This regimen isn’t enough by itself, but it’s a daily reinforcement of what I’ve forged on the range. It’s like brushing teeth; you just do it.

Now, I mention these facts to present readers with an example of where competence comes from. It comes from training; lots of training on a regular basis. And in the absence of lots of training on a regular basis, the result in every case is an unsafe and incompetent individual. There are and never have been any exceptions to this fact.

So don’t shoot yourself. Train right, train often, and pay particular attention to the draw and re-holster operations. Pay attention to these things a few hundred times a month. Or else.

EDC During Wartime

by Andy Rutledge 0 Comments
EDC During Wartime

My everyday carry complement has changed over the year. As we are currently at war (and will likely be at war for centuries) I carry what will allow me to better respond to a wartime attack by a trained group. This means extra rounds, a larger firearm, and a tourniquet. More on this in my article here.

Here (below) is my EDC kit.

Wartime EDC

Review: Incog Eclipse IWB Holster

by Andy Rutledge 2 Comments

Appendix carry is seemingly becoming all the rage of late. At least that’s the impression I get based on conversations with friends and the articles and videos I see. I have to believe that part of the reason is that holsters for effective and comfortable carry in that position are getting better.

Enter the INCOG series of holsters. INCOG is a joint development projects between Haley Strategic Partners and G-Code Holsters. Their first product (that I’m aware of) was the INCOG Holster System, which offered a somewhat modular array of holster, mag holder, and belt clip arrangements. The INCOG Eclipse IWB holster is tailored more specifically for the mid-line or appendix-carry position.

Features

While not overly thick, the Kydex for the Eclipse is a bit thicker than most holsters I’ve seen. Sturdy. As most are, the Kydex is molded to the pistol model, which allows for positive retention without an over-tight retention adjustment (it’s adjustable). The interior is very slick and smooth.

The edges of the Kydex are very smooth. While other holsters have smooth, rounded edges, they tend to them leave a sharp ridge where the rounded edge meets the flat surface. Not so with the Eclipse; they did a proper job of smoothing things out for our comfort.

The exterior, like all INCOG holsters, is covered in what G-Code calls Tactical Fuzz. This covering basically makes the holster’s exterior feel like suede. This grippy texture aids in comfort when worn without an undershirt and helps keep the holster in place when worn with an undershirt.

Incog Eclipse holster

incog2

incog3

incog4

You’ll notice in the photos that the belt clip is angled. The adjustable Super MoJo adapter has this angle to press the holster away from the belt and into your body, which aids in concealment. I can attest that this feature does work, as it renders my Eclipse more concealable than other, more minimal holsters that don’t have this spring-like effect.

The clip is plastic and seems to have good strength and position memory. The business end of the belt clip is strongly angled for good belt grip. It even has a handy tab for easy removal when you’re ready to disarm.

incog mojos

Here’s a detail of the Super MoJo clip attachment (from the G-Code website). It allows you to adjust the position and angle of the belt clip on the holster to account for proper balance for your specific pistol and preference.

Carry

I’ve carried my Glock 26 with the Eclipse for a little more than a month and I find it to be highly concealable. Appendix carry is not always comfortable per se, but having used three or four other holsters in this position, I find the Eclipse to be among the more comfortable.

I have worn it while visiting the mall, driving my truck, raking leaves in the yard, even cleaning house. Most of the time I forget that I’m wearing it. On a very important point, some holster made for mid-line or appendix carry do not offer full access to the grip of your pistol. The Eclipse does.

wearing the Incog holster

As you can see, a compact pistol under a t-shirt is quite easy to conceal with the Eclipse. Here, I’m wearing my Glock 26 in the appendix position.

carrying the Incog holster

Incog holster

Incog holster

Conclusion

I’ve used several different holsters for appendix-position carry; both those made specifically for it and those that are otherwise suitable for that position. My experience shows that the INCOG Eclipse is the most concealable, and among the most comfortable of the lot.

The Kydex is slick inside and quite thick (read: durable) and the Tactical Fuzz does seem to be a positive and useful feature, despite the silly name. The belt clip is excellent and employs a springy strategy that other holsters haven’t yet caught onto. In short, this one works. I give it a thumbs up. Also, I’ll keep wearing it.

* * *

Photos of the holster by the author
Photos of the author by Evan Rutledge