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A Hands-On Defense

With this morning’s drill I’m drawing from almost three decades of martial arts practice to augment my armed defensive technique with my EDC pistol.

In a hands-on situation it will likely be very hard to draw and bring a concealed pistol into the fight, but there are ways to buy time and gain position. This drill is just one way for a very specific situation. DO NOT TAKE THIS AS INSTRUCTION AND DO NOT TRY THIS DRILL WITHOUT PROFESSIONAL INSTRUCTION FROM A QUALIFIED INSTRUCTOR, as it is very easy to shoot yourself in the arm or hand!

Note also that this technique puts you in a fairly dangerous position, with your underarms, ribs, and several other vital attack points greatly exposed. The mitigation for this exposure is a quick reversal of position, taking away those targets before the assailant can attack them. It ALSO exposes the firearm, placing it in close proximity to the assailant. It is therefore vital that the distraction (elbow strikes) be executed with viciousness and ferocity so that the assailant doesn’t notice the brief exposure.

Dirty, One-Handed Training

Today’s training involved a lot of wounded-wing, one-handed manipulations. This means that I dropped my gun on the ground 60 or 70 times, getting it pretty dirty.

Glock 19 Gen 5, dirty

Glock 19 Gen 5, dirty

Partly I drop my pistol so that I can practice picking it up and reloading one-handed (because my other arm got shot and is useless now). So I draw out, put a round on target, “get shot in one arm” and drop the pistol, pick it up and then perform a 1-handed reload and put 2 more rounds on target with that one hand.

The other reason I drop my pistol here is to do a bit of a shakedown vetting of both the new Gen 5 pistol and the new Inforce APLc light. I want to see if anything can’t take normal, everyday punishment. I’m happy to report that everything held up just fine. Though I notice that dropping my gun tends to turn on the light most times. Not unusual, since the activation paddle gets pressed on the drop.

This is a staple drill in my routine, but it can be hard on equipment. I always do it with my EDC rig, but I let backup guns (same setup) take most of the punishment most of the time.

Three at Ten in Less Than Two

Working the Gen 5 G19 out of its new APLc-compatible holster. First time I’ve done holster work with the Gen 5 with its light. The holster rides very low, so while it conceals very well, my draw is a bit slower than I’m used to.

Here I’m just drawing from concealment as I move of the X and putting one round on each of 3 targets: middle, left, then right…in less than 2 seconds.

Yes, that third rep was a 100% miss. Happens when you push boundaries. That’s why it’s called training. 🙂

Inforce APLc Light

For a while I’ve been a Surefire XC1 man and have that on both my carry gun and bedside-defense pistol. A strange anomaly I’ve discovered while training at the range (more later) has convinced me that something better might be in order. So I’m trying the next best thing–so far as size and functionality are concerned. Today my new Inforce APLc light arrived.

I’m putting this one on my new-ish Glock 19 Gen 5. I’ve ordered a holster to accommodate this new configuration and we’ll see how that works out, soon.

Inforce APLc

Pistol Drill: Four Shots, Three Ways

I spent a lot of time running this drill this morning; ran it probably 40 or 45 times. The video here shows my 3rd or 4th time through the drill, then my 34th time through the same drill. My shirt was much sweatier that last time. 🙂

The drill (on 6×12 steel at 25 yards)
– Draw from concealment (moving off the X) and put 1 round on target at 25 yards,
– run to 11 yards & change to support hand, 1 round,
– run back to 16 yards & change to strong hand, 1 round,
– run back to 25 yards, 1 round w/both hands
– par time is 16 seconds.

Two, I mean Three Bad Guys

Today’s training included some close-range drills with multiple targets. After a few reps we started to regard the second target as a new bad guy who arrived late. In this drill I engaged the second bad guy and was performing an admin reload (to ensure I had a full gun after the initial engagements) and my training partner Dave yelled, “Oh shit!” So I had to go back to the gun one-handed on a “new” bad guy. Wasn’t expecting that.

Good training.

Pistol Drill: Five Inside Out

For this drill you’ve got 5 targets setup at 10 yards–three 6-inchers, a 10″, and a milk bottle. At the beep, draw from concealment and put one round on each, starting from the middle and then clearing the rest.

I did the drill about 25 times and while I had plenty of clean runs, I also had plenty of 1-miss runs; like this string of five in a row. :-/ Moar training!

Flee-Then-Engage Drill

This drill supposes you’re running away from an armed assailant, then a second cuts you off and you must defend.

Draw from concealment and put 2 rounds on the 8″ plate at 10 yards, you run empty so perform a reload and put 1 round on the other bad guy while advancing on him (intimidation factor works on most folks, causing panic or surrender or sloppiness).

I did this drill about 20 times today. This run was toward the end. Good workout!

Pistol Drill: Three Bad Guys

Here I’m engaging from concealment each of 3 bad guys at 9, 12, and 18 yards with 2 shots each, then re-engaging each with a shot to the head.

The first/closest I’m just point shooting. The others I’m paying attention to the sight picture. Couple of not-so-great head shots on the 2 distant targets. That’s why they call it training. Need Moar!