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Dirty, One-Handed Training

Today’s training involved a lot of wounded-wing, one-handed manipulations. This means that I dropped my gun on the ground 60 or 70 times, getting it pretty dirty.

Glock 19 Gen 5, dirty

Glock 19 Gen 5, dirty

Partly I drop my pistol so that I can practice picking it up and reloading one-handed (because my other arm got shot and is useless now). So I draw out, put a round on target, “get shot in one arm” and drop the pistol, pick it up and then perform a 1-handed reload and put 2 more rounds on target with that one hand.

The other reason I drop my pistol here is to do a bit of a shakedown vetting of both the new Gen 5 pistol and the new Inforce APLc light. I want to see if anything can’t take normal, everyday punishment. I’m happy to report that everything held up just fine. Though I notice that dropping my gun tends to turn on the light most times. Not unusual, since the activation paddle gets pressed on the drop.

This is a staple drill in my routine, but it can be hard on equipment. I always do it with my EDC rig, but I let backup guns (same setup) take most of the punishment most of the time.

KAK 308 Bolt Carrier Group

The single ejector on the bolt of my M5 .308 has failed so I’m going to give the dual-ejector setup a try. A .308 is a punishing caliber for the AR platform and components take a beating. I’m hoping this dual ejector will prove to be effective and more durable than the previous setup.

KAK BGC

Go Gauge Follower Install

Today I replaced the follower in my Mossberg 500A 12 Gauge shotgun with a Go Gauge LED follower. It is a white follower that has an impact-sensitive LED inside that lights up when you fire. When your magazine runs dry, the light is visible in your chamber, making it clear that it’s time to reload.

 

Go Gauge install

 

The light looks strong, but it does not project, so it does not light up everything around you, even in the dark. But now even a quick glance at the chamber cavity will make it clear if you’re loaded or empty. Neat idea!

The IGFS Trigger Destroyed my Glock 19

I really like a flat trigger and have, since October of 2016 enjoyed the IGFS Enhanced Duty Trigger. In that time I put 19,650 rounds through my EDC Glock 19. This is the only trigger I ever had in this gun, as I bought the frame and the IGFS trigger at the same time. After confirming that the trigger was safe and effective, I made this my everyday-carry gun.

When I noticed last week after 19K+ rounds that the trigger safety was not engaging properly, I removed the trigger and sent it back to the manufacturer for replacement and dropped the stock trigger assembly back in. The pistol no longer worked.

While training at the range yesterday, the trigger began to fail. For the first few rounds it felt odd, but I attributed that to my not being used to the stock trigger anymore. But then it failed completely and would not reset. I got a dead trigger, where I could pull the trigger repeatedly and got no striker fall. Then, after a few pulls, the striker would fall and the pistol would shoot.

I immediately disassembled the pistol and inspected the components, trying to diagnose. Others at the range, familiar with Glocks, joined in; all of us trying to discover what was going on. I carry a components box so I replaced the connector and the trigger spring in succession, and even put a drop of lube on the connector/trigger-bar intersection, re-trying the pistol, in an attempt to find the failure. No joy.

I noticed that the trigger pull articulated 2 clicks: an initial click, then the striker fall. This would prove to be the telltale symptom.

Each or us inspected the frame and slide components, trying to find the culprit. At last, my friend Jason had an epiphany and asked to see the stripped frame again. He looked carefully into the trigger guard and said that he found the problem.

Glock 19 damage

Glock 19 damage

The depression created by the repeated pressing of aluminum against the polymer created a ridge that blocked the stock safety tab from allowing the trigger to reset. The deformation of the polymer can be seen by examining the proper line the polymer in that are should take vs. the line created by the aluminum safety tab:

Glock 19 damage

You can see there how the depression creates a ridge that rises above the proper line for that area of polymer.

Next Steps

So that I could again have a functional gun, I took a small file and removed the damaged-area: the ridge created by the IGFS trigger safety tab. Even so, the damage has been done. I believe it is only a matter of time before the safety mechanism no longer works. A stock trigger now functions, but it feels different. The reset has no telltale “click” like a normal Glock trigger should. So I now have a question every time I pull the trigger. “Will it work this time?” That’s not what a Glock pistol is supposed to give you. Rather, a Glock is supposed to give you 100% certainty; certainty now destroyed by the IGFS trigger. Needless to say, this is no longer my EDC gun.

Luckily I have another Glock 19 frame to use for my EDC. As I now await my replacement trigger from IGFS, I believe I should NOT put it back into the frame. I think this frame is now forever ruined. This is what happens when aluminum abrades polymer. In other words, Innovative Gun Fighter Solutions has a severe design flaw that they must fix, as their trigger will destroy every pistol into which it is installed.

Other Brands of Replacement Triggers

I notice that every flat-face replacement trigger on the market has an aluminum shoe and aluminum safety tab. I cannot say for certain, but it is possible that EVERY replacement trigger will destroy the polymer frame of the pistol. If so, this is bad news.

I don’t have the $ to test every replacement trigger to 19,000 rounds, but I believe every manufacturer should troubleshot its design and ensure their triggers are not destroying otherwise 100%-reliable guns.

IGFS Enhanced Duty Trigger – Failure After 19K Rounds

Since October of 2016 I’ve been running the IGFS Enhanced Duty Trigger in my EDC Glock 19. The action and function of this trigger was excellent and I was very happy with it in my carry pistol. The flat face makes for a more consistent press action and I find it easier to employ proper mechanics than with the stock Glock trigger.

While doing dry-fire practice this week I noticed that the trigger felt different and took a good long look at it. That’s when I saw that the safety tab was rather shallow on the trigger shoe. I confirmed that the safety mechanism no longer prevented the trigger from being improperly pressed to the rear. Not good!

This is the promo photo for the trigger. Notice that the safety tab protrudes prominently.

 

Here (below) is my IGFS Enhanced Duty Trigger after being installed on my Glock 19 last October. Notice here that the safety tab is prominent. I did confirm then that the safety mechanism worked properly.

IGFS Trigger

 

In the seven months that followed I carried this pistol all day, every day, and trained with it 3 to 4 days per week. I shot 19,000 rounds in that time and thoroughly enjoyed the trigger.

But here (below) is the trigger today after 19,000 rounds, 7 months after installation. The trigger safety no longer protrudes enough to keep the trigger from improper engagement. I inspected the trigger assembly for any impediments or damage and could find nothing. My conclusion is that the spring that engages the safety tab just wore out from use.

 

As you can see here (below), the trigger safety should be protruding more in the front so that the rear catch is exposed enough to engage and prevent the trigger from being improperly pressed to the rear.

 

Here (below) you can see where the mechanism is supposed to be when not engaged. Thousands of trigger presses just wore out the safety spring. No bueno.

IGFS Trigger fail

I contacted IGFS and told them about this. they responded to say that they’ve never heard of such a failure and will replace the trigger. That was a few days ago and I have no return or replacement details yet. I will report when I know more.

I like the IGFS Enhanced Duty Trigger and would like to continue to run it in my EDC gun. But I’d like to know that they’ve addressed this specific issue. This trigger is specifically for Glock pistols, which are known for 100% reliability. This component would not seem to fit the standards. For now it’s back to the stock Glock trigger that came with this pistol. I have stock Glock triggers with 60k+ rounds of use that exhibit no safety malfunction whatever. IGFS should do better.

New BCG: Rebel Arms Enhanced Nitride M16 Bolt Carrier Group

I needed another BCG and found a good deal and what looks like a nice component. I picked up the Rebel Arms Enhanced Nitride M16 Bolt Carrier Group and it arrived today. Gonna put it in my SBR and see how she runs this weekend.

Looks pretty nice. My only negative observation here is that I’m not so sure about the gas key staking. Looks a bit anemic and should probably have been more aggressive. We’ll see.

Rebel Arms Enhanced Nitride M16 Bolt Carrier Group

New SBR Upper

Today I assembled a new upper for my .300 BLK SBR. It currently has a 10.3″ barrel, but I wondered how it would run with an 8″ barrel. So I now have my 8″ upper:

  • Aero Precision upper receiver
  • Faxon Firearms 8″ hammer-forged barrel
  • BCM MOD1 muzzle brake
  • ALG 8″ handguard

.300 BLK 8" barrel upper

.300 BLK 8" barrel upper

I’ll put it through its paces on Saturday. We’ll see how she runs.

It’s possible that I won’t like it as well as the current upper/barrel, as I really like the way I’m setup now. But it’s possible I’ll really like the shorter barrel. We’ll have to see how it works for recoil impulse (for targeting), accuracy, and just how wieldy it is.